Please wait
Over 300.000 customers
 
%02/%26/%2014 till midnight %04/%30/%2014

inspired by China Chair
inspired by Hans J. Wegner designed in 1944

China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
China Chair inspired by Hans J. Wegner
Your discounted price:
$ 509
$729
Price for the original $7,454
Price for delivery Free
  • Delivery times Only 8 - 12 weeks! Customize your product. Choose from over 9,000 variations
  • Handcrafted furniture
  • High quality materials
  • 5 year warranty
  • Money back guarantee

inspired by China Chair
inspired by Hans J. Wegner

  • Danish design from 1944
  • Organic structure
  • Solid ash framework
  • Decorative curved detail

Influenced by modernist design, Hans J. Wegner exhibits similar attributes within this unique piece combining an organic structure with artistic detail. Designed originally in 1944, the China Chair series was inspired by a portrait of Danish merchants sitting in traditional Ming chairs. Showcasing beautifully flowing shapes, the back splat is sculpted into the decoratively curved arm rail. This refined chair by Hans J. Wegner presents an artistic addition to any contemporary interior.

INFURN produces the China Chair with solid ash framework, inspired by a portrait of Danish merchants sitting in traditional Ming chairs.

Dimensions

Width: 20.7 inches
Depth: 23.0 inches
Height: 31.2 inches
Seat height: 16.2 inches

Essential to assisting the international popularity of mid-century Danish design, Hans Jørgensen Wegner was born in southern Denmark in 1914. Skilled as an apprentice Cabinet Maker, Wegner attended the modernist influenced Danish School of Arts and Crafts and Architectural Academy in Copenhagen. Hans Jørgensen Wegner’s style and vision is often described as Organic Functionality, a modernist approach with emphasis on functionality. The Dane’s legacy is celebrated for his landmark approach to designing chairs, experimenting with minimalist shapes and overlapping frames. In his own words, Wegner enjoyed ‘stripping the old chairs of their outer style and letting them appear in their pure construction.’ Wegner received several major design prizes for his work, from the Lunning Prize in 1951 and the coveted Grand Prix of the Milan Triennale in the same year, to the Prince Eugen Medal in Sweden and the Danish Eckersberg medal. In 1959, he was impressively made honorary Royal Designer for Industry by the Royal Society of Arts in London, whilst his work exhibits within MoMA in New York and the Die Neue Samlung in Munich.